Electronic Gears Explained

Updated: Sep 28, 2020

They have been around for a few years and are becoming increasingly popular. E Gears (electronic gears) are cable free gear changing with either a wired system or a wireless system.

Firstly, let’s explore the advantages and disadvantages or Egears. To set the scene we need to go back to cable gears and precisely to the cable itself. Cables have two primary faults. 1. Cable stretching 2. Cables gumming up inside the Sheath


1. Cable stretching is caused by gear usage over the months. The cable stretches and gears will need slight tweaks to keep it in tune. However, usually, cyclist do not tweak their cycles, preferring just to ride, leaving the gears to become progressively worse.


2. Gummed up, frayed or rusted cable cause the cable to stick or move slowly directly affecting the speed and quality of the shifting. It will become harder to move the gears and gain that smooth change.

Egears solve both of these issues. Remove the cable and you remove the stretching and slow response.

Other than that Egears work on the same way as standard derailleurs. Tap the shifter, the gears move up or down with precision. They can be adjusted and the Shimano Di2 systems has ten 0.2mm adjustments for precise tuning. SRAM is similar.

Are there any downsides? Not really. The battery will need charging but the manufacturers say this is 2500 - 5000 km which is substantial and is around the same distance as a chain lasts so this is in fact, incredible.

So you get precise changing 100% of the time and have to charge it when you change you chain. Sounds pretty good to us. But...


The price. SRAM‘S for for a 1x11 starts at £740.00 (for the rear gear, both leavers and the battery/control centre) and 2x11 from £830.00 and the Shimano Ultegra system coming in at similar prices. SRAM also do the X01 and X11 mountain bike systems and Shimano XT and XTR.

Is this value? Well yes. It will make your biking experience much better. Clean precise shifting always.

Simple free advice from Warsash Cycles.